Kpi Green Ipo

Kpi Green Ipo

It also captures the Holding Period Returns and Annual Returns.KPI Green Energy IPO
  1. According to the draft red herring prospectus filed with the market regulator, the company has an installed capacity of 8.
  2. The offer for comprises equity shares of up to Rs 75 crore by Boman Rustom Irani, up to Rs 37.
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Kpi Green Color Code

Key metrics that are tracked by leadership to “judge” how the organization is performing.KPIs, Control Charts and Linking of Measurements | BPI Consulting
  1. Many organizations use the KPIs in a balanced scorecard that show how the organization is performing versus goals.
  2. Coded as Green, yellow or red to make it easier for leadership to see if the KPI is where it is needs to be.
  3. Green means the KPI is doing well, yellow means that the KPI may be headed for trouble, and red means that action needs to be taken to improve the KPI.
  4. I am amazed at how often we think we have to make things “easy” for leadership.
  5. In this newsletter, we assume that our company has already selected our KPIs.
  6. Stacey Barr is a performance measurement specialist, and her website has a lot of great information on how to select, develop, and use KPIs and performance measures.
  7. What we cover in this newsletter is how to monitor the KPIs over time and how to develop performance measures thout the organization that link to the KPIs.
  8. Please feel free to add your comments at the end of the newsletter.
  9. One company, some years ago, developed KPIs for leadership to monitor on a monthly basis.
  10. We use these five KPIs as our company’s KPIs to demonstrate some points.
  11. This company did many things right, but not setting up the KPIs.
  12. If you explore the link above, you find that Stacey Barr has an article on the ten biggest mistakes in managing organizational measures.
  13. Number one is to “rely just on financial statements.
  14. These are measures of important things to a business.
  15. But they are information that is too little and too late.
  16. Too little in the sense that other results matter too, such as customer satisfaction, customer loyalty, customer advocacy.
  17. Too late in the sense that by the time you see bad results, the is already done.
  18. But to this company’s credit, they did a few other things correctly.
  19. First, they examined the results using control charts.
  20. Stacey Barr has the number 6 biggest mistake as “using tables, instead of graphs, to report performance.
  21. ” I would go a step further and say that the best approach is to use control charts”.
  22. We start with different ways organizations may examine the results.
  23. To be f, there are lots of fancy scorecards available for displaying KPIs.
  24. We focus on a few simple things that are done.
  25. For years, companies have used their “monthly report” to monitor results.
  26. Some companies st use a version of this for their KPI reporting.
  27. The data for December 2010 are shown in the table below.
  28. He shows, in detail, how the monthly report is an extremely poor method to use to man an organization.
  29. The monthly report approach does not tell you anything about the underlying process behavior.
  30. Other organizations use some form of a balanced scorecard to monitor results.
  31. Coding system is sometimes used to determine if the KPI is getting into danger territory.
  32. It is pretty arbitrary where the boundaries are set.
  33. Many scorecards don’t show anything but the value and the color to make it easier for leadership to see where there are problems.
  34. Sometimes, there be an arrow next to the value.
  35. If the arrow is going up, it means that this month’s result is better than last month’s result.
  36. If the arrow is going down, it means this month’s result is worse than last month’s result.
  37. The problem with these approaches is that they do not examine the underlying process that generates the results.
  38. Just if it is meeting some preset specification that leadership developed.
  39. This hampers finding problems early and working on real process improvement.
  40. “Understanding variation is the key to success in quality and business”.
  41. Understanding variation is the key to effectively using control charts.
  42. The control limits define the natural variation in the process.
  43. The lowest value the process generate is called the lower control limit.
  44. The largest value the process generate is called the upper control limit.
  45. Wheeler now refers to these limits as the natural process limits and to control charts as process behavior charts to emphasize that it is not about “controlling” but about “process.
  46. The individuals control chart is usually the best option to use for monitoring KPI data that is taken monthly.
  47. We build this chart in steps, starting with the 2009 data.
  48. The first step is to simply plot the data over time.
  49. Six points above the aver, six points below the aver.
  50. Now let’s add the control limits and see what they mean.
  51. Based on the data, the largest value you would expect this process to generate is 17.
  52. The smallest value you would expect this process to generate is 3.
  53. As long as all the points are within the control limits and there are no patterns, the process is said to be in statistical control.
  54. If there are points beyond the control limits or patterns present, special causes of variation are present.
  55. These are not part of the way the process was designed to operate.
  56. Now, let’s add the data for 2010 to the control chart.
  57. Operating income to drop each of those seven months.
  58. The objective is to find out what caused this drop and remove it from the process.
  59. This is much more information than you have by examining a table of numbers or one of the scorecards.
  60. In the vast ity of companies, leadership does not use control charts to monitor what is important to them.
  61. Here are some of the reasons I think that leadership doesn’t use control charts.
  62. Leadership doesn’t fully understand variation and thinks that control charts are for those closest to the process.
  63. You have to look at a chart for each KPI and interpret it.
  64. Definitely not as easy as looking at Green, yellow and red.
  65. Leadership doesn’t think they need a chart of any type to tell them when there is a problem.
  66. Leadership doesn’t like the width of the control limits.
  67. It takes too long for some signals to occur, like seven points in a row.
  68. Their usual scorecard but with the ability to see the control chart.
  69. An organization’s KPIs should be communicated thout the organization.
  70. You want all employees to work on improving the KPIs.
  71. Not easy to explain that to everyone in the organization.
  72. These regions probably have the same KPIs as the Leadership Team.
  73. Each warehouse should have performance measures that impact our KPI.
  74. The warehouse usually doesn’t directly impact income but the warehouse does directly impact total expenses.
  75. So the warehouse should be looking at performance measures that have the biggest impact on their total expenses.
  76. Overtime in the warehouse has a direct impact on total expense.
  77. Lines shipped and received per employee is a measure of productivity that impacts expense.
  78. As you link measurements downward in an organization, the frequency of data collection should increase.
  79. Finally, the KPIs link down to the people closest to the job.
  80. The figure above shows some possible performance measures for those closest to the process in receiving and picking.
  81. For example, the person receiving might be tracking lines received per day and problems found during receiving or when putting material away.
  82. A picker would be tracking picking accuracy, problems found at picking and lines picked per day.
  83. People closest to the job should be collecting data on a daily basis, a week at the most.
  84. Some people have concerns about monitoring individual performance.
  85. Someone always have the lowest picking accuracy.
  86. And it is almost always the process that must be changed for lasting improvement to occur.
  87. This newsletter has demonstrated how to track KPIs using control charts.
  88. Most scorecards today do not take into account the underlying process behavior when providing results to leadership.
  89. The control chart approach does this and is superior in analyzing process results.
  90. To improve KPIs, you need to link the KPIs thout the organization down to those closest to the process.
  91. The frequency of data collection increases as you move down th the organization.
  92. And, of course, those performance measures should be tracked using control charts.
  93. For a lot of great information on performance measures.
  94. Happy charting and may the data always support your position.
  95. “Share your thoughts and opinions related to this posting”.
  96. It is to get upper manment to understand how to use control charts.
  97. Thanks B for the mention, but most of all, thanks for laying out so clearly such a powerful way to display KPIs.
  98. And always encour people to use XmR charts for their KPIs.
  99. Donald Wheeler’s book “Understanding Variation”, which you mention, is fantastic.
  100. It’s a book truly written for manment, in such an approachable and practical style.
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